• GEM LAB

Asymmetries: Race, Media and the Asia(s)


Wednesday, November 18 @ 4-6pm


//Digital Event

//Readings are suggested

//Contact gemlab.concordia@gmail.com to register

Panelists: Michelle Cho (University of Toronto), Feng-Mei Heberer (NYU), Eng-Beng Lim (Dartmouth College), and Meenasarani Murugan (Fordham). Moderated by Joshua Neves (Concordia)

Asymmetries features four provocations about race from the perspective of Asia and Asian media studies. Panelists will share examples from their current research, discuss the asymmetries of North American race and ethnic studies for understanding Asian racial dynamics, and address timely conceptual and methodological problems at the intersection of race/media/Asias. Examples include Filipina migrant workers in Taiwan and their use of Facebook, caste in diasporic South Asian television, Chinese privilege in Singapore, and the conflict between a decades-long media narrative of Black-Korean antagonism and the more recent one of K-pop's antiracist politics.

Welcome and Introduction: Joshua Neves

Panel 1: "Colonial Residues, Relational Racism"

Michelle Cho and Eng-Beng Lim

Panel 2: “Platforms, Bodies, Place”

Meenasarani Murugan and Feng-Mei Heberer

Suggested Readings


David Theo Goldberg. “Racial comparisons, relational racisms: some thoughts on method.” Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2009.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01419870902999233


Rijuta Mehta. "Brokering Suitability: On "Indian Matchmaking." LA Review of Books, 2020. https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/brokering-suitability-indian-matchmaking/

"Chinese Privilege, Gender and Intersectionality in Singapore: A Conversation between Adeline Koh and Sangeetha Thanapal." From b2o: an online journal. https://www.boundary2.org/2015/03/chinese-privilege-gender-and-intersectionality-in-singapore-a-conversation-between-adeline-koh-and-sangeetha-thanapal/


Adrian Chen, "The Laborers Who Keep Dick Pics and Beheadings Out of Your Facebook Feed." Wired, 2014. https://www.wired.com/2014/10/content-moderation


“Blackface and depictions of indigenous people in South Korea in the 1960s, 1970s, and today.” from Gusts of Popular Feeling, 2020.

https://populargusts.blogspot.com/2020/07/blackface-and-depictions-of-indigenous.html



Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, Concordia University, 1250 Guy Street, FB 319,Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3H 2T4

Mailing address: Gem Lab, School of Cinema, FB 319, Concordia University, 

1455 Maisonneuve BLVD. West, Montreal, QC Canada, H3G 1M8

 

  • Facebook Clean
  • Twitter Clean